Sometimes even good kids get in trouble with the law. Kids from good families steal to get attention. Sometimes they drink, do drugs or destroy property to fit in with their friends. When these situations arise, it’s crucial to have a trusted Juvenile Representation Lawyer by your side to defend your child’s rights.

Trusted Juvenile Court Lawyer

Juvenile-Representation-LawyerYour child could have the potential to go to college. A criminal conviction could impede their progress. Your child’s success is worth hiring a juvenile criminal defense attorney to fight for dismissal or reduction of a criminal charge, or to seek alternative sentencing options in the event of a conviction.

Contact Virginia juvenile crimes attorney Sheryl Shane right away.

At Sheryl Shane, Attorney at Law, we represent juveniles in divorce or custody proceedings or in cases of abuse or neglect.

Trusted Juvenile Court Lawyer

Your child could have the potential to go to college. A criminal conviction could impede their progress. Your child’s success is worth hiring a juvenile criminal defense attorney to fight for dismissal or reduction of a criminal charge, or to seek alternative sentencing options in the event of a conviction.

Contact Virginia juvenile crimes attorney Sheryl Shane right away.

At Sheryl Shane, Attorney at Law, we represent juveniles in divorce or custody proceedings or in cases of abuse or neglect.

Juveniles Charged With Crimes in Virginia

When a juvenile has been charged with a felony or misdemeanor crime in Virginia, the process and potential punishments can be very different from those for an adult. For example, a juvenile is more likely to lose their license when convicted.

In some cases, juveniles are represented by a Guardian ad litem, someone who will represent the child’s best interest in court. Sheryl Shane is a former Guardian ad litem and she brings that experience to representing juveniles in court when they have been charged with misdemeanor or felony crimes in Northern Virginia, including:

Furthermore, juvenile court system has their own specialized court staff and probation officers to assist with young offenders. They also have their own detention facilities and other type of shelters and programs.

Although the court process and punishments can be different for juveniles, there are some things that are not different at all. The constitutional protections for children are the same as for adults. And it is still important for juveniles to seek the advice of an attorney before giving any information to the police after they are arrested. In some cases, depending on the crime, juveniles can be tried as adults.

Juvenile Conviction

Juveniles can be convicted of felonies and misdemeanors just like adults. Substantive and Procedural Laws are similar in the same ways, but different in others. For instance, Juveniles in same instances may have records expunged. It depends on the age of the child, the severity of the charge(s), whether the case is in the Juvenile and Domestic Relations District Court or Circuit Court, along with several other factors. It is important to hire an attorney who has represented the youth. Your child’s future may be at stake.

  • 16.1-299. Fingerprints and photographs of juveniles
  1. All duly constituted police authorities having the power of arrest shall take fingerprints and photographs of any juvenile who is taken into custody and charged with a delinquent act an arrest for which, if committed by an adult, is required to be reported to the Central Criminal Records Exchange pursuant to subsection A of § 19.2-390. Whenever fingerprints are taken, they shall be maintained separately from adult records and a copy shall be filed with the juvenile court on forms provided by the Central Criminal Records Exchange.
  2. If a juvenile of any age (i) is convicted of a felony, (ii) is adjudicated delinquent of an offense that would be a felony if committed by an adult, (iii) has a case involving an offense, which would be a felony if committed by an adult, that is dismissed pursuant to the deferred disposition provisions of § 16.1-278.8, or (iv) is convicted or adjudicated delinquent of any other offense for which a report to the Central Criminal Records Exchange is required by subsection C of § 19.2-390 if the offense were committed by an adult, copies of his fingerprints and a report of the disposition shall be forwarded to the Central Criminal Records Exchange and to the jurisdiction making the arrest by the clerk of the court which heard the case.
  3. If a petition or warrant is not filed against a juvenile whose fingerprints or photographs have been taken in connection with an alleged violation of law, the fingerprint card, all copies of the fingerprints and all photographs shall be destroyed 60 days after fingerprints were taken. If a juvenile charged with a delinquent act other than a violent juvenile felony or a crime ancillary thereto is found not guilty, or in any other case resulting in a disposition for which fingerprints are not required to be forwarded to the Central Criminal Records Exchange, the court shall order that the fingerprint card, all copies of the fingerprints and all photographs be destroyed within six months of the date of disposition of the case.
  • 16.1-301. Confidentiality of juvenile law-enforcement records; disclosures to school principal and others
  1. The court shall require all law-enforcement agencies to take special precautions to ensure that law-enforcement records concerning a juvenile are protected against disclosure to any unauthorized person. The police departments of the cities of the Commonwealth, and the police departments or sheriffs of the counties, as the case may be, shall keep separate records as to violations of law other than violations of motor vehicle laws committed by juveniles. Such records with respect to such juvenile shall not be open to public inspection nor their contents disclosed to the public unless a juvenile 14 years of age or older is charged with a violent juvenile felony as specified in subsections B and C of § 16.1-269.1.
  2. Notwithstanding any other provision of law, the chief of police or sheriff of a jurisdiction or his designee may disclose, for the protection of the juvenile, his fellow students and school personnel, to the school principal that a juvenile is a suspect in or has been charged with (i) a violent juvenile felony, as specified in subsections B and C of § 16.1-269.1; (ii) a violation of any of the provisions of Article 1 (§ 18.2-77 et seq.) of Chapter 5 of Title 18.2; or (iii) a violation of law involving any weapon as described in subsection A of § 18.2-308. If a chief of police, sheriff or a designee has disclosed to a school principal pursuant to this section that a juvenile is a suspect in or has been charged with a crime listed above, upon a court disposition of a proceeding regarding such crime in which a juvenile is adjudicated delinquent, convicted, found not guilty or the charges are reduced, the chief of police, sheriff or a designee shall, within 15 days of the expiration of the appeal period, if there is no notice of appeal, provide notice of the disposition ordered by the court to the school principal to whom disclosure was made. If the court defers disposition or if charges are withdrawn, dismissed or nolle prosequi, the chief of police, sheriff or a designee shall, within 15 days of such action provide notice of such action to the school principal to whom disclosure was made. If charges are withdrawn in intake or handled informally without a court disposition or if charges are not filed within 90 days of the initial disclosure, the chief of police, sheriff or a designee shall so notify the school principal to whom disclosure was made. In addition to any other disclosure that is permitted by this subsection, the principal in his discretion may provide such information to a threat assessment team established by the local school division. No member of a threat assessment team shall (a) disclose any juvenile record information obtained pursuant to this section or (b) use such information for any purpose other than evaluating threats to students and school personnel. For the purposes of this subsection, “principal” also refers to the chief administrator of any private primary or secondary school.
  3. Inspection of law-enforcement records concerning juveniles shall be permitted only by the following:
    1. A court having the juvenile currently before it in any proceeding;
    2. The officers of public and nongovernmental institutions or agencies to which the juvenile is currently committed, and those responsible for his supervision after release;
    3. Any other person, agency, or institution, by order of the court, having a legitimate interest in the case or in the work of the law-enforcement agency;
    4. Law-enforcement officers of other jurisdictions, by order of the court, when necessary for the discharge of their current official duties;
    5. The probation and other professional staff of a court in which the juvenile is subsequently convicted of a criminal offense for the purpose of a presentence report or other dispositional proceedings, or by officials of penal institutions and other penal facilities to which he is committed, or by a parole board in considering his parole or discharge or in exercising supervision over him;
    6. The juvenile, parent, guardian or other custodian and counsel for the juvenile by order of the court; and
    7. As provided in §§ 19.2-389.1 and 19.2-390.
  4. The police departments of the cities and towns and the police departments or sheriffs of the counties may release, upon request to one another and to state and federal law-enforcement agencies, and to law-enforcement agencies in other states, current information on juvenile arrests. The information exchanged shall be used by the receiving agency for current investigation purposes only and shall not result in the creation of new files or records on individual juveniles on the part of the receiving agency.
  5. Upon request, the police departments of the cities and towns and the police departments or sheriffs of the counties may release current information on juvenile arrests or juvenile victims to the Virginia Workers’ Compensation Commission solely for purposes of determining whether to make an award to the victim of a crime, and such information shall not be disseminated or used by the Commission for any other purpose than provided in § 19.2-368.3.
  6. Nothing in this section shall prohibit the exchange of other criminal investigative or intelligence information among law-enforcement agencies.
  7. Nothing in this section shall prohibit the disclosure of law-enforcement records concerning a juvenile to a court services unit-authorized diversion program in accordance with this chapter, which includes programs authorized by subdivision 1 of § 16.1-227 and § 16.1-260. Such records shall not be further disclosed by the authorized diversion program or any participants therein. Law-enforcement officers may prohibit a disclosure to such a program to protect a criminal investigation or intelligence information.
  • 16.1-307. Circuit court records regarding juveniles

In proceedings against a juvenile in the circuit court in which the circuit court deals with the child in the same manner as a case in the juvenile court, the clerk of the court shall preserve all records connected with the proceedings in files separate from other files and records of the court as provided in § 16.1-302. Except as provided in §§ 19.2-389.1 and 19.2-390, such records shall be open for inspection only in accordance with the provisions of § 16.1-305 and shall be subject to expungement provisions of § 16.1-306. In proceedings in which a juvenile, fourteen years of age or older at the time of the offense, was adjudicated delinquent in juvenile court on the basis of an act which would be a felony if committed by an adult, or was found guilty of a felony in the circuit court, any court records, other than those specified in subsection A of § 16.1-305, regarding that adjudication or conviction and any subsequent adjudication of delinquency or conviction of a crime, shall be available and shall be treated in the same manner as adult criminal records.

Convicted as an Adult

A juvenile can be charged with felony and misdemeanor crimes. If the child is fourteen or older they can be certified as an adult. The judge will base his or her decision on whether they think the juvenile is competent to face the adult consequences of the crime they committed.

If convicted of a crime as a juvenile, records are not as easily expunged. It could be used against them later in life and cause further problems.

Virginia Juvenile Representation Lawyer

Sheryl Shane will treat you and your child with respect and compassion. She will work diligently and passionately to try to reduce the effects of this charge on your child’s future.

If your child has been charged with a crime, contact a Virginia juvenile court lawyer today to fight the charges. Sheryl Shane will use her experience to work passionately to get the charges dismissed or reduced and to seek alternative sentencing options.